Attic Inscriptions Online

Just a quick post to plug a fairly new resource for Classicists (and especially for ancient history teachers):  Attic Inscriptions Online. https://www.atticinscriptions.com/ Attic Inscriptions online is a collection of translations of translated inscriptions from ancient Athens, going from the 6th century BCE to the 4th century CE (the bulk however are from the fifth and... Continue Reading →

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There goes the Sun

(photo credit: William Unruh) Something is happening to the Sun.  Though the sky is clear and cloudless, and the Sun far above the horizon, the light has been slowly dimming, until it seems as dark as a cloudy day in winter.  The air is feeling wintry too - it's been getting steadily colder for a... Continue Reading →

Words that Last: Clay, Papyrus, and Computers

Two articles recently published on the BBC website recently caught my eye. The first was a discussion of the earliest known writing on Earth, as part of a series on ‘50 things that made the modern economy’. These earliest written texts were economic texts: inventories of goods, sale contracts, IOUs, written in Sumerian Cuneiform more... Continue Reading →

The Byzantine Republic

I recently finished reading a book on an aspect of the Classical world that neither I, nor many other Classicists likely have thought much about. The book is Anthony Kaldellis’ The Byzantine Republic, which deals with the Eastern Roman Empire (called by modern scholars “Byzantine”) which ruled a fluctuating area centred on Anatolia and the... Continue Reading →

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