“I Go to Die”

Just came across this video of Sir Derek Jacobi performing Socrates' final speech from Plato's Apology.  Wish they'd used a slightly more up-to-date translation, but still a very powerful performance.  


Attic Inscriptions Online

Just a quick post to plug a fairly new resource for Classicists (and especially for ancient history teachers):  Attic Inscriptions Online. https://www.atticinscriptions.com/ Attic Inscriptions online is a collection of translations of translated inscriptions from ancient Athens, going from the 6th century BCE to the 4th century CE (the bulk however are from the fifth and... Continue Reading →

Lost Wax

I came across this video by the National Geographic, which explains the Lost Wax technique of creating ancient bronze sculpture.  I found it riveting, and indeed it's the first time the process was explained in a way that made sense to me.

The Music of Tragedy

Greek Tragedies were as much musical as theatrical performances.  Much of the text uttered by the Chorus, and some by individual characters as well, was sung.  The ancient tragedians were as much composers as writers, creating both the texts and the musical settings.  Indeed, in Aristophanes' Frogs, when the ghosts of Aeschylus and Euripides fight... Continue Reading →

Words that Last: Clay, Papyrus, and Computers

Two articles recently published on the BBC website recently caught my eye. The first was a discussion of the earliest known writing on Earth, as part of a series on ‘50 things that made the modern economy’. These earliest written texts were economic texts: inventories of goods, sale contracts, IOUs, written in Sumerian Cuneiform more... Continue Reading →

The Watchman

Helen Eastman, director of the last three Cambridge Greek plays, is embarking on what I think is a really amazing project:  filming short excerpts from ancient Greek tragedies, in Ancient Greek (with subtitles).  Check out her first offering, "The Watchman" in which actor Leon Scott performs the opening speech of Aeschylus' Agamemnon: Having both acted in and... Continue Reading →

More Boardgames

I'm working on a longer post, but for the moment I thought I'd do some quick links to showcase the work of my friends and colleagues.  Boardgames and ancient times seems to be a major point of intersection in the circles I move in, and two Cambridge classicists have done some amazing work adapting pre-existing... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑