Attic Inscriptions Online

Just a quick post to plug a fairly new resource for Classicists (and especially for ancient history teachers):  Attic Inscriptions Online. https://www.atticinscriptions.com/ Attic Inscriptions online is a collection of translations of translated inscriptions from ancient Athens, going from the 6th century BCE to the 4th century CE (the bulk however are from the fifth and... Continue Reading →

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Historiai: a belated explanation

Having given my blog a new name and style (what we hip media academics call 'rebranding') I realized it might be worth explaining what the new name means. Historiai is the plural of the word historiê (ἱστορίη); this is, of course, the term from which English 'history' is derived.  And in Greek and Latin, from the fourth... Continue Reading →

The Byzantine Republic

I recently finished reading a book on an aspect of the Classical world that neither I, nor many other Classicists likely have thought much about. The book is Anthony Kaldellis’ The Byzantine Republic, which deals with the Eastern Roman Empire (called by modern scholars “Byzantine”) which ruled a fluctuating area centred on Anatolia and the... Continue Reading →

The Afterlife of Baʿal

My friend and colleague Philip Boyes writes about the strange evolution of an ancient Near Eastern deity. Well worth checking out!

Ancient Worlds

(or, What This Ugaritian Storm-God Looks Like Now Will Astound You!)

1200px-Baal_thunderbolt_Louvre_AO15775 Ba’al on a stele from Ugarit, now in the Louvre

Callot 2011 Reconstruction 2 Reconstruction of the Temple of Ba’al on the acropolis of Ugarit. From Callot 2011

Ever since excavations began at the Syrian city of Ugarit in 1929, the importance of the god Baʿal has been clear. Among the first Ugaritic texts discovered at the site were mythological tablets recounting the legends of this god; Baʿal’s temple was excavated in prime position on the city’s acropolis, close to that of his father Dagan. While the supreme god El occupied the pinnacle of the Ugaritian pantheon, as more and more ritual and religious documents have been recovered from Ugarit, it’s become unquestionable that the city’s people felt a particular fondness and affinity for Baʿal, the archetypal king who had his palace on Mount Saphon overlooking the city.

But Baʿal was not solely…

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More Boardgames

I'm working on a longer post, but for the moment I thought I'd do some quick links to showcase the work of my friends and colleagues.  Boardgames and ancient times seems to be a major point of intersection in the circles I move in, and two Cambridge classicists have done some amazing work adapting pre-existing... Continue Reading →

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